Yoga Sutra 4.03 a breach in the retaining barrier of the natures

Sūtra IV.3

That cause is not the impelling drive itself, but it makes a breach in the retaining barrier of the natures, as does a farmer (for irrigation)

Righteousness, etc., though cause, cannot be the impelling drive of the natures. What happens, then? It makes a breach in the retaining barrier as does a farmer. The farmer, to irrigate a terraced field by flooding it with water from another (higher) field, does not take the water in his cupped hands, but makes a breach in its retaining barrier; when that is breached, the water pours into the lower field of itself. Similarly, righteousness breaches unrighteousness, the retaining barrier of the natures. When it is breached, the natures flow out into their respective forms.

Righteousness, etc., though cause, cannot be the impelling drive of the natures. A cause cannot be powered, in a reversal of the cause-effect relation, by an effect like righteousness, which is merely a guiding cause. What happens, then? It the guiding cause, righteousness, etc. makes a breach in its retaining barrier: when that is breached, the water pours into the lower field of itself . Similarly, righteousness breaches unrighteousness, the retaining barrier of the natures. And unrighteousness too breaches the barrier which is righteousness. When it is breached, the natures flow out into implement their respective forms.

Then again, a farmer in his field cannot force the nutrients of water or earth into the roots of his grain. What does he do, then? He removes weeds like mudga, tinduka, gavidhuka and śyāmāka. With these gone, the nutrients enter, of themselves, the roots of the grain.

So righteousness is a cause only as being simply annihilation of unrighteousness, because of the absolute opposition between its purity and the impurity (of the other); but righteousness is not an impelling cause of the activity of nature. Here there are the examples of Nandīśvara and others. Conversely, unrighteousness inhibits righteousness, entailing a transformation into impurity, as exemplified by such as Nahuṣa.

Then again, a farmer in his field cannot force the nutrients of water or earth into the roots of his grain. What does he do, then? He removes from the roots of the grain weeds like mudga, tinduka, gavidhuka and śyāmāka. With these gone, the nutrients enter, of themselves, the roots of the grain.

So righteousness is a cause only as being simply annihilation of unrighteousness, and unrighteousness is similarly annihilation of righteousness, because of the absolute opposition between its purity and the impurity (of the other); but righteousness is not an impelling cause of the activity of nature. Here there are the examples of Nandīśvara and others. Conversely, unrighteousness inhibits righteousness, entailing a transformation into impurity, as exemplified by such as Nahuṣa.

(Opponent) Well, when a yogin projects several bodies, do they have one mind between them or a mind each?

This is something which has not been explained about the samādhi perfection.

 

Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!