Yoga Sutra 3.09 extravertive saṃskara is overcome

Sūtra III.9

The inhibitive transformation of the mind is when extravertive saṃskāra is overcome and the saṃskāra of inhibition is predominant, and mind itself is in a temporary state of inhibition

The extravertive saṃskāra is a characteristic of the mind: it is not of the nature of an idea. The saṃskāra of inhibition is also a characteristic of the mind itself. Of the two, there are subjection and predominance respectively (in the state of inhibition): extravertive saṃskāra-s are excluded and saṃskāra-s of inhibition are in possession. At the time of inhibition, the mind accords with the subjection and predominance. During the continuance of the change in the saṃskāra-s of the one mind, there is the inhibitive transformation.

The inhibitive transformation of the mind is when extravertive saṃskāra is overcome, and saṃskāra of inhibition is predominant, and mind itself is in a temporary state of inhibition, extravertive: going out in various directions to function in the form of ideas in the mind; the saṃskāra laid down by that is a characteristic (dharma) of the mind its possessor (dharmin). It is not of the nature of an idea.

And the saṃskāra which is not an idea, of produced by inhibition is also a characteristic of the mind itself An extravertive saṃskāra, not being itself an idea, is not inhibited by inhibition of ideas. It is not overcome even though extravertive ideas may have been inhibited.

From inhibition of ideas, however, a saṃskāra of inhibition is laid down. Of these two the saṃskāra-s of extraversion and of inhibition, in the mind their possessor, there are subjection and predominance respectively.

(Opponent) Are the appearance of the one and disappearance of the other independent?

(Answer) No.

(Opponent) How is it then?

(Answer) The saṃskāra-s of extraversion are excluded, they are unable to bring about their effects and the saṃskāra-s of inhibition are in possession.

(Opponent) At the time of inhibition, does the mind accord with the subjection and predominance, as their possessor?

(Answer) The inhibitive transformation in the mind is when it accords with the subjection (of extravertive) and predominance (of inhibitive).

That continuance as explained of the change in the saṃskāras of the one mind, the change of saṃskāra-s by subjection of the extravertive and predominance of the inhibitive, comes about by exclusion of the extravertive, though there is still some connection, and predominance by the inhibitive because of their greater power, and this is called inhibitive transformation.

Then the mind, in the inhibition of samādhi, is declared to consist of saṃskāra-s alone.

Then being inhibited from external ideas the mind is declared to consist of saṃskāra-s alone. As was said (I.18): ‘The other follows on the practice of the idea of stopping, and consists of saṃskāra-s alone.’ As this change terminates in inhibition, inasmuch as it makes for the absence of ideas, it is called the inhibitive transformation.

In cognitive (samādhi), though ideas do still exist, they are not being referred to here. Here it is only the fact of continued change of saṃskāra-s. Though there might also be samādhi when the consciousness is in the inhibited stage, that is not being referred to, but only the fact of inhibition. What is being spoken of is only saṃskāra-change, which occurs in the seeded condition (cognitive samādhi) as well. It is not a question of the ideas and one-pointedness of samādhi.

 

Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!