The infinity of knowledge free from all veiling taint

Sūtra IV.31
Then, with the infinity of knowledge free from all veiling taint, the knowable comes to be but a trifle

Then, knowledge is freed from all veils of taint and karma, and there is infinity of that knowledge.
Knowledge-sattva, which is infinite, (when) overcome and obscured by tamas, in places is set in motion by rajas. Thus stimulated, it can perceive. When it is freed from all veiling taints, there is infinity for it. With the infinity of knowledge, the knowable is but a trifle, like fireflies in the sky.

Then, with the infinity of knowledge free from all veiling taint, the knowable comes to be but a trifle. Then, with the Raincloud samādhi, knowledge is freed from all veils of taint and karma, born of rajas and tamas, and there is infinity of that knowledge, which is pure Knowledge-of-the-difference between mind-sattva and Puruṣa. How is it so?
Knowledge-sattva, which is infinite, (when) overcome and obscured by tamas, with the rajas taint suppressed, like a great waveless ocean, isolated, immutable – how could it be capable of perceiving anything? He replies: in places mind-sattva is set in motion by rajas; thus stimulated, as the vastness of the ocean surface is ruffled by the wind, it can perceive. There is no activity in sattva as such, for capacity for action is from rajas.
Then (when it is freed from all veiling taints) there is infinity for it mind-sattva, for there is nothing left to know: it is like the sun in the middle of a clear sky with all clouds dispersed and gone. With the infinity of that knowledge, there being nothing left to know, the knowable is but a trifle, like fireflies in the sky. As there is nothing to find out about fireflies in the sky, so there is nothing to be investigated now.

On which it has been said: ‘The blind man pierced the gem; the fingerless man strung it on a thread; the neckless man wore it; the tongueless man praised it.’

In the state of knowledge of the highest, there is total disappearance of illusion, and absence of any purpose of Puruṣa, and to show it, he presents this which has been said: ‘The blind man pierced the gem, the fingerless man strung it on a thread, the neckless man wore it, the tongueless man praised it.’ (Taitt. Ār. I.11)
Though it is impossible for the blind man and his companions to pierce the gem or do the other things attributed to them, still through illusion it is made out that the blind man did pierce the gem. So also the relation of knowledge and what is knowable holds only in the state of illusion (viparyaya). Without illusion, the guṇa-s become void of all purposes of Puruṣa.

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