Ethical living according to Dharma makes the spiritual experience easier3 min read

Let us consider the position of moral virtues in Vedanta. In the holy Yoga the inner life is considered more important than the outer life. Ethical living according to Dharma makes the spiritual experience easier. In Vedanta a good life of benevolence, peace, study, devotion and meditation occupies the highest position. In the Bhagavad Gita as well as in the Upanishads the ethical virtues occupy a prominent position. Shri Shankaracharya also accepts their importance. Let us consider the social virtues as described in his writings.

The life of Sannyasa is necessary to purify our feelings. Inner and outer purity, peace of the senses and the mind, renunciation, asceticism and forgiveness are the five great virtues of a monk. Of these purity is the first, as without it other virtues do not grow in the soul.

By water and other outer means the body is purified. The mind is purified by giving up attachment, that is pleasurable associationship for individual satisfaction. So says the holy Acharya in his commentary on verse 7 of Chapter 13 of the Bhagavad Gita. When inner and outer peace have been cultivated, the way is clear to renunciation, austerity and contentment. Social virtues occupy a very important position in Vedanta. They do not only help quiet meditation but also help our social conduct. The virtues so far mentioned prepare the mind for the social virtues.

Purity gives sweetness of disposition and teaches us a lesson in humility. Cultivation of peace within and without fills our mind with compassion and gives rise to the flame of harmlessness towards others. Renunciation also implies generosity, liberality and charity; by this means our conduct is made easy and sweet. Fearlessness is a great virtue in the daily life of a Vedantin, and self-control practised with devotion in view gives us a real feeling of fearlessness. Contentment inspires our heart with friendliness towards all and shows us the way to Truth. The most holy Acharya says that self-reliance, love of truth, fearlessness, simplicity and non-violence are the cardinal virtues of Vedanta. No fearlessness is possible without faith and truth which make our speech, mind and conduct sweet. Unless a man is established in non-violence, he cannot be a man of forgiveness and peace. Humility is not a sign of weakness but of great strength.

The five great virtues of a Sannyasin are the foundation of the spiritual life. In the Bhagavad Gita they are called ‘spiritual wealth. They are the ethical aspect of the spiritual Truth and when cultivated with interest, diligence and patience bring our heart nearer and nearer to God.                                                      

Index for this series of essays

1.Introduction : Limitations make Reality appear what it is not

2.Preliminary Observations : ”Darshana” means the search after the ultimate truth of life in the world

3.Brahman as the cause of the world : According to Vedanta, Brahman is the highest truth

4.The Jiva : Shri Shankara gives no hint as to the birth of the Jiva

5.Advaita : There is no other existence apart from the existence of Self (Atman)

6.Maya : The theory of Maya is found both in the Upanishads and in the writings of Shankara

7.Theory and Practice : Vedanta can he learned only by practice

8.The help of a Guru is needed : The real essence of Shruti is the great experience of the Sage

9.The function of Reason : Realised experience alone is the highest proof in determining the nature of Self

10.Contemplation (Niddhidhyasana) : Sat-Chit-Ananda is an experience of the Self and not of the mind

11.Renunciation (Sannyasa) : In the philosophy of Shri Shankara, the highest good is Moksha

12.Moral virtues : Ethical living according to Dharma makes the spiritual experience easier

13.The Personal God (Ishvara) : In Vedanta, devotion to God is the greatest instrument of spiritual cognition

14.Release (Moksha) : According to the Advaita Vedanta of Shri Shankara, release (Moksha) is eternally true.