The Post-Beatles Generation and English quality of life

The middle-aged in Britain at present complain about the lack of respect for authority and the lack of consideration for others. The middle-aged have always done this. In 423 B.C. Aristophanes in Greece was  putting on comedies which showed how young people were questioning the authority of their parents. In one of his plays a …

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Looking back over Victorian Times and English quality of life

It’s a hard Life It is an interesting fact that most British people think of the Victorians as rather ‘heavy’ people, very staid and without zest. One reason is that the photographs we have of our grandparents are all from the early era of photography, when the person being photographed had to keep absolutely still …

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The Ideal of Balance and English quality of life

The gentleman-ideal is not an exclusive English thing. The elements have come from many sources, and though it has been developed in Britain, it must be developed further. The valuable elements which have developed so far have included, in my opinion, these: (1). The concept of life as a sport, undertaken very seriously under strict …

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English Quality of Life and ways in which British people think and act

In the famous “Thinker” of Rodin, a Frenchman. The pose, with one elbow on the opposite knee, is a most uncomfortable one, though the sculptor’s skill makes it seem calm. Foreigners remark sarcastically that it shows how the French twist themselves into knots when they think, and there is a saying, “Every Frenchman is a …

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Warukuchi from the English Heart of Tradition

It is difficult to translate the Japanese word warukuchi into English; as often in translation, there is no exact equivalent. The dictionary gives various words: abuse, slander, calumny, defamation, scandal, backbiting. But no single one of them is exactly right. Abuse has the sense of shouting, coarse language, and insult. But warukuchi is not necessarily …

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North-South-East-West from the English Heart of Tradition

In the British Broadcasting Corporation weather forecasts, the English phrase ‘here and there’ comes often. For instance, a forecast may say: “The snow which fell in the north of England yesterday has now mostly melted, though there are still some patches of snow here and there.” When this is translated into Japanese, ‘here and there’ …

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Social Conventions and Surprises from the English Heart of Tradition

Social conventions, which we learn as little children, have no surprises for us. In fact, they fade away to the fringe of consciousness, because we do not have to think about them consciously. For instance, Japanese people and British people say Thank You’ a great deal; Americans say it less, and Spaniards do not like …

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Trevor Leggett talks in 1976 to Japanese students about English views of the French and the Germans

The French and the English For centuries the French and English have fought each other, not only in Europe but all over the world. In the 20th century the two countries were allied against Germany, but there is still an undercurrent from the depths of our history of antagonism. In English slang, the word “French” …

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Our civilization to-day is in danger of becoming fact- ridden

Everyone born within the last two generations has seen in his lifetime such far-reaching changes that the world has literally become a different place from the one which his father grew up in. The power to master our environment that we now possess has to many seemed an end in itself, something supremely worth-while, providing …

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China was not saved from the Mongols by the Great Wall

It is a matter of deep concern to all reflective persons, that in both international and domestic politics, self-interest is the keynote. Each nation for itself, each party or class for itself, each man for himself, is the principle which at present guides human affairs. Aggrandisement of the strong at the expense of the weak …

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Mount Chittrakut

As the intoxicating perfume of the rose lingers where once it bloomed; as the notes of the sweet winged creatures are heard in memory, after they have flown; as the holy “OM” of the Ganges penetrates into the deep woods and stirs the hearts of the anchorites engaged in divine contemplation; as the tender whispers …

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It was thought that human society was evolving from lower to higher forms

In a long period of increasing prosperity, the Victorians enjoyed the first substantial benefits of the advancements of science and saw no reason to doubt that these would: multiply ever more abundantly, until all men would share in the riches and culture of an enlightened age. The’ Darwinian theory of biological evolution, suggested by’ analogy …

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