Kobo never chooses the brush

The people who are throwing the bombs are not physically starved, but they’re starved spiritually. They’re longing to hear something which will expand the spirit; because they can’t find it and can’t hear it, they are taking to these imprisoning thoughts and actions, and therefore anybody who practises meditation with a right life (rings bell) the dharma will speak through them.

Sense experiences during meditation

Sense experiences during meditation are not what the yogi may imagine beforehand; all the accounts show a sort of surprise when the experiences first come. They are more beautiful than anything in the world, and are quite different from hallucinations or dreams. The commentators say that they are genuine perceptions, but of objects not normally accessible to perception. If they produce attachment to their delight, it blocks further progress in yoga, because independence is lost. After a few such experiences, the teacher always directs the pupil to meditations on truth. Attachment to these higher sense experiences, like any attachment, darkens and restricts the mind, which loses its purity and strength. They come and go. They are self-terminating, because the excitement they arouse interferes with the necessary concentration, which becomes split between the meditation, and what he expects to get as a result. The same applies to drug experiences. When meditation …

Read moreSense experiences during meditation

To have inner voices is regarded as a symptom of dysfunction

To have inner voices telling one something is regarded as a symptom of dysfunction. There have been some notable exceptions, however. In the 1920’s there was a case where a woman went to her doctor complaining of voices in her head – voices and other noises, even including music. He referred her to what was then called a mental specialist, who asked her about the voices: “What sort of things are they saying?” She said, “Oh, all sorts of things. Sometimes bits of news, sometimes quite long bits of music.” “No, no, no, I mean what are they saying to you, what are they telling you?” “They don’t say anything to me personally. Right now they say they’re just going to start up a concert, and they say that it’s Beethoven, Leonora No. 3.” “Ah, dear lady, the No. 3, yes. One of Beethoven’s rare miscalculations. If only he had …

Read moreTo have inner voices is regarded as a symptom of dysfunction

The ultimate independence of Self-realization

In armies, the chains of command have to be settled. One problem is: conflict of orders. Suppose a soldier is ordered by an officer to take a small box to HQ, and on the way an officer asks where he is going, and then says: “Oh, so you can take this packet and hand it in at the radio station – it’s not far out of your way.” Now should the soldier take the packet which will inevitably delay him or should he refuse and say. “Sir, I’ve got to deliver this box straight away”? In history, some armies have opted for the First Order, and some for the Second Order. But let us look at the application in inner spiritual training. The rule here is: First Order. When even a little inner practice is being done, the buddhi – the fraction of the cosmic mind which is located in …

Read moreThe ultimate independence of Self-realization

The mind can be taken as the bucket of water

There is a bucket to be cleaned, which is now nearly full of putrid water. It has been left alone for a good time. There may be various ways to go about it. One of them is to put it under a tap of running water, and just leave the tap to run unsupervised. At first, the jet from the tap carries some of the top layers of dirty water out with itself. But after a little time, the upper part of the bucket consists mainly of fresh water, which just comes in from the tap and directly spills out over the sides. The deeper layers may be relatively undisturbed for a very long time. The second main way is to empty the whole bucket of dirty water down the drain, then scrub the inside of the bucket, and then rinse it with the pure water. That gets it really …

Read moreThe mind can be taken as the bucket of water

The Ethical Bazaar

A businessman who practised yoga in a group, went to a senior for advice. “There is an opportunity for me to do quite a bit of good to some people in need, but it would mean tricking another man. I know that he is quite a rogue, so I feel tempted. The good would outweigh the bad, and he would get no more than he deserves, what he has himself done to others. I can’t find this sort of case covered in the traditional books.” “No,” agreed the senior, “the general principles are sometimes difficult to apply, but let me ask you about something in my own experience. When I was young, my brother was starting up a life assurance business. To help him to make a start, I took out a savings policy, at a monthly premium which I could just about afford, and kept this up for a …

Read moreThe Ethical Bazaar

Dragon Head, Snake Tail

Dragon Head, Snake Tail is a Chinese phrase meaning something that starts out very impressively but ends up as commonplace. An example is the following folk-tale, found all over the world. A father leaves to his children not much more than a house and an adjoining field, his last words being that there is a family tradition of a treasure hidden in it. He dies before he can explain further, but they know that in past wars, rich people have buried valuables before fleeing, hoping to come back later and recover them. The children dig hopefully for a time, but with steadily decreasing enthusiasm as they find nothing. One gives up, but a couple go on out of reverence for their father. They know they are just tilling the soil, digging a bit deeper perhaps, and throwing the occasional stone on to the rubbish heap in the corner. They never …

Read moreDragon Head, Snake Tail

Seeing The Unseen

‘It is clear before you, but you do not see it,’ says the Zen master. ‘It is self-evident, but hard to find’, says the holy Indian text. They are speaking of the ultimate reality, the supreme goal of human life, and some people find these seeming contradictions obscurantist and, perhaps, irritating. They foresee a lot of clever talking, but nothing of any use in life. However, we can find examples, in our own daily life, of just these contradictions, and to resolve them is a stimulus to inner training. Ask a few people to look at a garden and describe what they see. They will name the main features: grass, flowers, perhaps a few small rock, a bush – and so on – but then they are told: ‘You have left something out.’ They go into more detail, but again are told: ‘You have left something out, a big thing.’ …

Read moreSeeing The Unseen

When we are young we often have a keen sense of right and wrong

There are many habitual actions in life like driving a car or writing which become habitual and drop away from the surface of consciousness; we can do them without much effort and become at ease with them. Because we are at ease with them we have the illusion that they get better. We see this clearly in the case of handwriting, which steadily degenerates from the carefully formed letters we make at school through to the scrawls of student days, and then to the almost incomprehensible jottings later on in life, when we no longer form many of the letters properly. These are often difficult to read except by someone who is quite familiar with the writing. Without conscious practice towards a definite model, the edges of precision gradually become blunt, and, moreover, the monitoring function is not used and thus becomes dull. This can apply in the moral field …

Read moreWhen we are young we often have a keen sense of right and wrong

Some scholars study texts in which they have no interest whatever in the real meaning

In the early days of Hi-fi, one would be invited, sometimes, to a little concert in a room surrounded by speakers of various kinds. Listening to the music, the host would be constantly jumping up and making some adjustment, and then sitting down and listening intently. He was disturbing the enjoyment of the music, but in fact he himself was not listening to it at all: he was listening to the hi-fi. In the same way, some scholars study texts in which they have no interest whatever in the real meaning; they simply compare the vocabulary, syntax and themes with those of other texts in the same field, and record borrowings and conflicts: ‘Here he is making a concession to the vijnana-vadin Buddhist, a possible influence from his presumable early study of gaudapada.’ He is not interested in the texts themselves except for cross-cataloguing the themes. There is an unspoken …

Read moreSome scholars study texts in which they have no interest whatever in the real meaning

Prepare oneself to throw away gain and loss, life and death

In training for some desired result, especially when it involves an expansion of some faculty, there is a sense of joy. It is leading to what is felt to be an achievement, and so it is a sort of fulfilment in itself. Mistakes have to be avoided as much as possible, but when they happen, they are corrected without any feeling of guilt – they do not really matter. However strong the efforts that have to be made, there is at the basis a sort of carefree lightness, and this we can call “light joy”. But when it comes to the actual occasion, the arena where we have to try out the actions we have been rehearsing, how is it then? A mistake does matter now – it might be fatal to the whole enterprise. For many, what had been an interesting challenge now becomes a frightening necessity, and the …

Read morePrepare oneself to throw away gain and loss, life and death

Bird-man and Earth-man

Short passages from the inspired scriptures are at first reading often skated over as simply details filling in the main outline of the point or story. And this is liable to go on during subsequent readings; with many readers, what they do not see at once, they never see at all. The parable of the Sower is one of the best known, but though most modern Christians take the meaning to be rather obvious, it was this very parable which the disciples asked Jesus to explain to them. He reprimanded them for their dullness: ‘You do not understand this parable?’ he said, ‘then how will you understand any parable?’ The parable is found in three Gospels: Matthew 13.4, Mark 4.3 and Luke 8.5. The accounts are fairly close; let us look here just at the beginning: ‘A sower went out to sow. And as he sowed, some seed fell along …

Read moreBird-man and Earth-man

No-name bridge

Some coastlines in the East, owing to volcanic origins, have small islands separated from the mainland by only a small stretch of water. But the current may be so strong that in rough weather a ferry may have to wait hours before it can attempt to cross. And in some cases, the rocky cliffs make a bridge dangerous, unless it is a massive affair. On one such island there were three villages, with a fierce local pride. They had a primary school, but from about twelve the children had to cross to get to the middle school. On the island was a couple with the somewhat unusual name of Akudu, who had an only son, and no other relatives. The parents were killed in a storm, and the local council paid for the rest of the boy’s education, and then proposed apprenticing him to a local artisan, as he seemed …

Read moreNo-name bridge

See, Hear, Understand, and Sit On

The huge body of Chinese Buddhist scriptures, which include not only translations of many Indian texts which have disappeared in India but also many texts which originated in China, are sometimes put together in the form of an enormous revolving book-case, in the form of a great drum. There is a belief that modern man – beginning presumably with the modern men in China of the first century AD when Buddhism arrived there – cannot be expected to study them all. Or even half, or even a quarter, or even a fraction of them. But if he has the faith, and stands before that great drum of the scriptures, and simply turns it round a complete revolution – why then, he will get the same merit as if he had studied them. It is a bit like the Tibetan prayer-wheel, though that has only one scripture, or sentence from a …

Read moreSee, Hear, Understand, and Sit On

Categories Zen

There is no response from the True Face within

Some people say that though I meditate and do practice, there is no response from the True Face within. A teacher said for example think you are an electrician and are rung up to go around at once for some urgent repair but then came back home again complaining that there was no one in. You then telephone the place and are told, ‘I have been in all the time waiting for the electrician! Why don’t you come?’ ‘But I rang the bell and rang and rang and there was no answer!’ The teacher said that if in the same way repairing the bell is our immediate task when we practice, then there will be a response. Theoretically we know that the air is full of radio waves, we are familiar with it theoretically. But people might ask, ‘Where are these waves? They are not here.’ And we say, ‘Oh, …

Read moreThere is no response from the True Face within

The Power of Formlessness

There is a story in many forms, in different cultures and traditions. It is a very old one in India, possibly from before the Buddha. The Gods do battle with the Titans and the Gods win. There is something strange about the victory but anyway, the Gods take all the credit to themselves. While they celebrate, a report comes that something mysterious has been seen in a particular place in the Himalayas, something the form of which cannot be made out, which seems to have no form and yet it is there! So Indra, King of the Gods, sends the God of Fire – who symbolises various things including speech – to find out what this mysterious something is. He, too, cannot make it out: there is no actual form and yet there is something. And that mysterious something asks, ‘Who are you?’ He answers, ‘I am the God of …

Read moreThe Power of Formlessness

In Sojiji temple there is a picture of Nansen killing a cat

In Sojiji temple near Tokyo, there is a picture of the Chinese patriarch Nansen killing a cat. It illustrates a famous koan riddle. With his right hand he is holding aloft the glaring spitting cat, while his other hand grasps the sword. The Japanese master Dogen, founder of the Soto Zen line of which Sojiji is a head temple, remarked of the story, ‘Buddhism can be taught in this way, but it is open to abuse and is best avoided.’ A great Indian teacher who saw the picture remarked that the cat represents the mind. One of his pupils was asked about it, and commented: The teacher did not care for the company of cats. In the tradition, the cat was the only animal which did not come to mourn the passing away of the Buddha. Devoted to comfort as they are, they teach no spiritual lesson, whereas the dog, …

Read moreIn Sojiji temple there is a picture of Nansen killing a cat

They are indeed praying for him – to die.

Sometimes people complain that there are many things that go wrong for them. There are innumerable little worries about personal relationships, and not being able to afford this or that, or the noise of the traffic and so on and so on. They feel, “If only I were a millionaire, everything would be alright. Of course some people would dislike me but they would keep their mouths shut. And all these other little troubles would disappear if only I was very rich”. There is an interesting parallel to this: the case of the yogi on his bed of nails. When you see him, it does look terrifying; dozens and dozens of these sharp spikes on the board and he is lying on them (he has a little strip of wood under his head). We are impressed by his stoical endurance and give a coin to his attendant at which the …

Read moreThey are indeed praying for him – to die.

Putting Life Into Life

The business of getting the necessities is, for many people, a boring necessity. It is livelihood, not life. For them, life begins only after the work has finished. This is especially true when the work has to be done alone, with no one to talk to. Making endless entries in computers down to scrubbing the floor and steps, it is said to be soul-destroying work, in which there is no progress. One is simply a replaceable element in a machine. From the point of view of yoga, this is a big mistake. It is in just those jobs where not much mental alertness is required that there is a better chance for inner progress. They are good conditions for practising a special form of meditation – the meditation on bare action. Normally when doing these jobs, the mind is full of stray thoughts. If there has been a quarrel recently, …

Read morePutting Life Into Life

Speaking with no artificiality or insincerity

In some traditions pupils of 2 or 3 years standing are asked to give a brief talk to the public on some aspect of the teaching. Most are reluctant: they feel their progress does not merit it. However, when told this is part of training they are ready to try. Once such pupil was told to prepare by taking lessons in public speaking for 3 months. The instruction jarred on him and he complained to a senior: “To take lessons like that would make me feel like a ham actor, unnatural and insincere.” The senior looked at the vigorous young man before him and said: ” I’ve seen you once or twice working out at the gym. He ordered Tall-as-you-can and you all stood on tiptoe and stretched your fingers towards the roof. Then he shouted for Small-as-you-can and you squatted down with your head between your knees, hugging your …

Read moreSpeaking with no artificiality or insincerity

Meditation itself will take over and then it will begin to shine forth

A Japanese poem – Shizukasa ya Iwa ni shimiiru Semi no koe The translation could be – ‘Oh, the quietness. The shrill voice of the cicada Is soaked up by the stones.’ This is a temple scene. Suddenly in the quiet there is the bursting force of the shrill note of the cicada. It’s ear piercing while it lasts then it stops, and there is the moment when that shrillness is soaked up, soaks away into the stillness of the rocks, the stones, of the temple. We can find some hints for yoga practice in certain arts which require a clear discipline, especially music. In music the execution has to be not merely perfect, but often in a very short space of time, and musicians have to practise everyday. One virtuoso used to say “If I miss my practise for one day, next day I notice a deterioration in performance; …

Read moreMeditation itself will take over and then it will begin to shine forth

His mind had not yet been loosened to recognise the cosmic plane

Learning a Language When we begin to learn a foreign language, we may learn a few words by the so-called Direct Method. But for anything more than simple meanings, we have to construct an English sentence in our heads, and then search for equivalents and structures in the foreign language. This can go on for a very long time, even when there is a good knowledge of the new language. It takes courage to bring out a foreign sentence without checking it first. Shaw’s remark, that it is impossible to learn to skate without looking ridiculous, can be useful here. If the grip of fear can be loosened, the time comes when in some little emergency, the speaker finds himself producing a foreign sentence without the previous English draft. He has begun to think in the new language. This is generally a decisive moment, and from then the ideas take …

Read moreHis mind had not yet been loosened to recognise the cosmic plane

Bristles of egoism and pride and self-satisfaction and conceit and ambition

When someone who has a hope of getting some advantage lavishes praise and compliments on us, we feel quite unaffected, because we know that it’s simply turned on like a tap, to get something from us. It might as well be a tape recording. We think “Words, words, what do words matter? Nothing at all.” But then when his request is refused perhaps he becomes furious. He begins calling us all the bad names he can think of, and we know that all of this abuse is just out of his disappointment and anger. Nothing in it – turned on like a tap or a tape recorder. And yet this time it’s quite difficult not to be affected by it, though it is known to be completely false. These are little hints for meeting attractions and repulses from the world. A great Indian teacher used to say that adverse criticism …

Read moreBristles of egoism and pride and self-satisfaction and conceit and ambition

The Anti-Sermon of No Words

In Mahayana Buddhism, emphasis is laid on what is called the Sermon of No Words. This is a sermon preached by mere behaviour, by demonstration of one pointed spiritual effort in calmness, by the absence of instinctive reactions to events, and by what is called a spiritual atmosphere generated by the presence. It is a sermon not by exhortation, reasoning or threats but by example. There is also the reverse of The Sermon of No Words: one might call it the Anti-Sermon of No Words. People become irritated when warned about the evils of drugs, of promiscuous sex or malicious gossip by those who have heavily indulged in them. Perhaps they are speaking of vices they’re tired of and often the words go unheeded. But in fact they are putting out something else as well: an Anti-Sermon of no Words. We can see that their behaviour, reactions, sometimes even the …

Read moreThe Anti-Sermon of No Words

Passing moods are to be treated like clothes

We are asked not to become identified with passing moods, which are to be treated like clothes. Whether we are wearing bright clothes or dark clothes we have still to do what is before us, unaffected by the clothes we happen to be wearing at the time. In the same way, we must become independent of moods; although moods of depression or elation may come over us from time to time the important thing is to be entirely independent of them. We can help ourselves to do so by realising their artificial character, using the same example of clothes. The American sage Emerson is supposed to have remarked that for most people there are a few joys to rival the consciousness of being really well dressed. But if today we look at a photograph of this somewhat aristocratic New Englander in his best clothes we shall find it slightly comical. …

Read morePassing moods are to be treated like clothes

A vigorous spiritual vitality is the spring that waters all the fields

In Judo there are hundreds of different throwing techniques and manoeuvres and students in the early months of training hope to learn a new one every week or so. Some teachers refuse, and tell then to keep practising away at just a couple. Other teachers do in fact demonstrate many different tricks. The fact is that however many tricks a student may have in his repertoire, he will not be able to do any of them, because he has no balance. While he is making the moves which are designed to upset the opponent he begins to be upset himself. Sometimes he loses his balance so completely when trying to do a complicated movement at speed that he even falls over. In both cases the student thinks he is learning technique but in fact he is learning balance. The teacher has to calculate how many new tricks he has to …

Read moreA vigorous spiritual vitality is the spring that waters all the fields

When individuality is transcended there is a cosmic effect

A pupil heard a teacher say that when by long training the individuality is transcended there is a cosmic effect. This effect is far greater than anything produced on the individual plain by individual words and actions. So this pupil asked the teacher: “It is clear to us sir, when we face you, that your former individuality has been transcended. So how is it that you continue giving teachings? We are grateful for them but from what you have said it seems contradictory that you go on.” The teacher told him about an incident in a nineteenth century autobiography by a doctor who had lived near a crossroads. In the bleak winters of that century, sweepers were employed to keep the crossings clear of snow. The sweeper had a little hut where he lived, and was not paid much. The doctor, out of compassion, took an interest in him and …

Read moreWhen individuality is transcended there is a cosmic effect

Many ideas are absorbed into the cosmic purpose

In the great house of the personality, with it’s attics and lofts and cellars there are some rooms which are habitually used, some which are seldom used, some which are avoided, and some which are locked with no access at all. Yoga training at first includes getting used to some of the less frequented rooms and learning to use what is in them. As it progresses the house owner finds he is able to go somewhere that he has avoided, and he will occasionally find some little treasure there. As enlightenment is approached keys to the locked rooms become available. At first it may take a good deal of courage to use even the smallest of them. Because the room has been locked we do not know what is in it and the mere fact that it has been locked seems to imply that what is in it, is terrible. …

Read moreMany ideas are absorbed into the cosmic purpose

They do not have the support to stand on and enjoy the last laugh

In a certain dictatorship inhabitants were warned by official propaganda to beware of foreigners. If they had to talk to foreigners they were told to ask them what was their business in the country, and to report the replies to the police. A foreigner who had lived in the country before and knew the language was making another visit. He thought he would exercise his sense of humour and to a question from a restaurant owner as to his business he replied: “Well, don’t tell anyone but I am a spy.” He was gratified to see the shock on the others face. The restaurateur excused himself hurriedly and the foreigner went on happily eating his meal. Quite soon however the doorway was filled with the bulky form of the local police sergeant who sat down at the table and began: “You have said you are a spy and I am …

Read moreThey do not have the support to stand on and enjoy the last laugh

Personal success is swallowed up by the gradually revealed greatness of what they are practising

A hundred years ago a simple minded Indian peasant overheard a rich man say portentously, “Money attracts money”. He took a silver rupee from his tiny savings and went to the shop of a money lender in town with the idea of capitalising on this piece of knowledge. At one end of the counter the money lender was busy negotiating a loan. At the other end his strong-armed assistant was keeping guard over several piles of silver rupees. The peasant quietly came in and sat down in front of the money. When the assistant was momentarily distracted by a fit of coughing he took out his single rupee and put it on the counter opposite the mass of rupees. Then he waited for his money to attract money. Recovered from his coughing fit the assistant now noticed the single rupee on the counter, and assumed that he must have somehow …

Read morePersonal success is swallowed up by the gradually revealed greatness of what they are practising

God never seems to be at home

A new disciple in a yoga group had some difficulties and she prayed for help. After a couple of weeks of no change, she put her case to a senior: “I pray and pray for help, but there’s no response, God never seems to be at home.” The senior said: “This is something that happens in ordinary life too, there’s a small shop near here that sells electrical goods, and repairs them. They also send an engineer if there’s a problem in a house. Well, apparently there was a request for someone to go round on quite a simple job. So the boss sent a young apprentice of only fifteen who was very good with his hands. He gave him the address and a small pack of tools with the job sheet in it. But the boy came back after 20 minutes saying there had been no one at home. …

Read moreGod never seems to be at home

Enthusiastic students were told the story of Kyogen

In the classical Zen of China a monk, called by the Japanese Kyogen, was famous as a scholar who after many years had mastered the scriptures. When the Abbot, his teacher died the new Abbot told him he could if he wished leave the monastery as he had now full knowledge of the doctrine. To the others’ protests he set Kyogen the Koan riddle: “What is your true face before your father and mother were born?” Baffled and furious Kyogen left the monastery but the riddle haunted him. He spent the next years in isolation minding the shrine of the 6th Chinese Patriarch without hope or expectation but still revolving the riddle in his mind. Eleven years on as he swept the courtyard, the stroke of his broom sent a stone skidding across the ground to strike the bamboo fence. The loud Clack! seemed to knock away a wedge in …

Read moreEnthusiastic students were told the story of Kyogen

It takes a long time before Life forgives us for our own imitations

In the 1930s when Japan was preparing for war, foreigners were regarded with great suspicion, especially by the police. Sometimes the suspicions were built on chance coincidence without any substance, but in the official mind they proved hard to shift. A young accountant employed by a foreign firm used to enliven his evenings by visits to geisha houses, where he drank and talked and laughed with the girls. He never learned any Japanese but as it happened he was a very good mimic. In the course of these evenings he learned to sing some of the little songs along with the girls, mimicking their pronunciation with remarkable accuracy. In time he could sing some of these songs himself just accompanied by one of them on the three-stringed Samisen. He had no idea of the meaning of what he was singing. When war came suddenly he was arrested and interned along …

Read moreIt takes a long time before Life forgives us for our own imitations

The Blotch made by Zen Master Shido Bunan

The Zen Master Shido Bunan was once appealed to by a family of local lords at Okubo. For over twenty years they had been plagued by continuous misfortunes and they had consulted various astrologers, spirit mediums, and even some Buddhist priests, but without success. The disasters went on. When the request for help came Bunan read it and simply said: “there’s no need for me to make a special visit for this sort of thing. Give the messenger this.” He slumped down at his writing table, slapped down a sheet of white paper, snatched up a brush, and splodged what looked like a black rice cake in the middle of the sheet. He passed it to the messenger with the words “Tell them to paste it up somewhere.” The horrified messenger took it back and reported to the head of the Okubo family who also had the feeling he was …

Read moreThe Blotch made by Zen Master Shido Bunan

Money has nothing to do with the Truth

Some of the Christian missionaries who went to Japan in the mid-19th century were scholarly men, who mastered the language both spoken and Classical, and also made a study of basic Buddhism. However, one such found to his dismay that he was sometimes unable to meet the arguments of Buddhists in public debates, and decided that he must go far deeper into Buddhism to find the refutations he sought. He heard that the greatest scholar of Buddhism was a Zen abbot living in semi-retirement in a tiny monastery. He made inquiries, and found that the abbot never took any fee for his teaching and would not accept any money donations to the monastery. Scholars from all over Japan used to come to stay for two or three months in the nearby villages, paying rent, and the villagers served the tiny monastery in various ways: the local carpenters kept the building …

Read moreMoney has nothing to do with the Truth

There is something, not a sin, which often can’t be forgiven

A woman member of a traditional Yoga group also served on the fund-raising committee of a charity. Her written articles and her appeals at public meetings were attractive, and brought in many more donations than those of her colleagues. She began to notice a certain coolness towards her suggestions at committee meetings; they were nearly always turned down on some pretext. She mentioned this to the teacher, saying, “I wonder whether I am seen as bossy or something like that. I try not to present my suggestions in a pushy way, but still I feel I must be doing something wrong.” The teacher said: “People will forgive some bossiness in a good worker, though you don’t sound bossy. In fact, people will forgive almost anything in a good worker: arrogance, a bit of roguery, a bit of waspishness – all that sort of thing. But you’ve done one thing that’s …

Read moreThere is something, not a sin, which often can’t be forgiven

Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!