In Atman there is neither bondage nor deliverance, as in the sun there is neither night nor day. Atman is chaitanya, pure consciousness, but the dull-witted ones conceive the attributes of the intellect in Atman. Dull-witted ones.

Why are they dull-witted and why are others not? Owing to their karma. Those who perform good deeds, who are truthful and help the advance of society, who make sacrifices for others, who serve Guru and Govinda, they are not born as dull-witted and, even if they are, then their dull-wittedness is removed by the process of devotion, meditation and study. But as long as they are dull-witted, they see the attributes of the intellect in the Self and the attributes of the intellect are bondage and release, both.

“If the sun is obscured by the clouds, then those who have not quick-seeing eyes imagine ‘Lo! the sun has become dark'”. (“Hastamalaka Stotra” 12). But it is not so. Their eyes are obscured by the clouds and hence they imagine that the sun is obscured. The Self, says the voice of the Scriptures, is all bliss, infinite, above death and birth, but there is the rival principle called avidya or Maya, a principle which is not Sat and yet which is not Asat, like the principle which causes the dreamworld to appear. And as long as this principle covers our inner consciousness, we see the reflection of the inner consciousness through our senses in the form of this world where there is death, disease, disappointment, uncertainty and nothing is clear; all is blurred in some form or other.

This is the voice that the King in a dream, imagining himself to be a beggar, hears. He hears it. As he hears it, what does he try to do? He ought to give up his dull-wittedness. That is one thing. Chidabhasa must find identity with kutastha. The chidabhasa is kutastha, as students of “Panchadasi” will know. Either the King can say that the voice of the Scriptures is an hallucination, that the world is as it is; there is death, birth, sufferings, no certainty. But, if such is the world, why has a man a desire for satisfaction? Why is man not satisfied with it if there is nothing else? Why these urges in man to terminate sufferings? Why does he fear death? If death, disappointments, despair, insecurity, if they are natural, they ought to satisfy jiva but he is subconsciously aware of some other existence in which there is no bandha and no moksha.

Then the King may say: “What should I do now?”. First of all he must convince himself that the voice he has heard is not an hallucination. This is called the Gospel. The “Good news” is that the world seen by the senses is not bad, that the imperfections exist only in the dull-wittedness of the man and there is the possibility of the return of the man to normality.

What is normality? Has the jiva any experience of it? On several occasions he has glimpses of normality. In deep sleep he has not an unmixed but a mixed glimpse of it. In that state there is no consciousness of bandha, no consciousness of moksha, no consciousness of any obstruction, nor of despair and illness etc. But the glimpse still is not pure. In deep sleep there is a slight covering of the causal part of avidya, which obscures the Self without making it appear other than what it is. If avidya is intensified, then it performs two functions: it obscures the real Self, and then it makes it appear what it is not. In deep sleep only one function goes on, that the Self is obscured. Fifty per cent of normality is seen in the state of deep sleep.

We all sometimes, for a little while on some occasion or other, have a glimpse of the state in which there is no despair, no bandha, no moksha, nothing at all whatsoever. In a letter which Plotinus addressed to Porphyry he says: “On three occasions my worldly consciousness has been completely blotted out and I have had a glimpse of that grand unconditional consciousness. ” We meet one whom we have loved intensely, after an absence of twelve years, suddenly. Then man passes into a state which may be called a glimpse of the normal state of consciousness – no bandha and no moksha. Majnun passed into that state; people came offering him his wedding with Layla and he said: “I am Layla” and on certain other occasions also we know that this phenomenon takes place.

Sometimes music lifts the veil, sometimes art, but partially and partially only. Sometimes some drugs lift the veil, but partially and not completely. Sometimes a state of deep love lifts it for a little while. These things show that the world experienced by the senses is not all; there is something above this world and that something is subject to experience. That experience comes through the practice of Adhyatma Yoga.

The whole difficulty of man can be summed up: error and the question of how to achieve enlightenment. Our eyes are not reliable revealers of truth. The eyes have six great defects. One or two of them are easy to understand. The eye cannot see what is nearest to it, e.g. a speck of dust in the eye which can set up a painful irritation. Things very far are not seen. Things covered are not seen. The ears also are unreliable. Our taste is very unreliable. Our touch also, our ghranendriya, sense of smell, is also unreliable. Our mind is more unreliable than any instruments of precision; Russell accepts this truth.

As long as we use unreliable instruments, the experiences will be erroneous and incomplete. So it is said in the Gita (6.24): “Withdraw the senses into the mind, withdraw the mind into the intellect, and the intellect into pure ‘I'”. Then you will see. Gita: “By the eye of the correct knowledge the things are seen as they are.” Therefore the wise want to create a state of normality of consciousness and do not stop only with the reports of the senses and the mind. What is the first guide? Faith. Faith in what? In the validity of the scriptural statements.

If you have no faith in the validity of the scriptural injunctions and statements, you cannot become a Yogi, cannot go further into the matter where light is revealed as it is and consciousness sees things as they are in reality.

As science has established the doctrine of monism in the empirical realm, so in the spiritual realm the same doctrine was adumbrated thousands of years ago (“Chandogya Upanishad” 3.14.1): “Sarvam Khalvidam Brahman. Verily all is Brahman” and all multiplicity is merely an illusion.

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