It was about four o’clock in the afternoon. The heat of the sun had been mitigated by the cool breezes. Mats were spread on the roof-garden. Sat-Sangees were busy preparing the summer drink, almonds crushed and melon and cardamom seeds dissolved in cold water. Everything was ready. Bil (fruit) cooled in ice was added to the crushed and strained seeds and lotus petals were spread on the surface of the jug which contained the cooled drink.

A Sat-Sangee said: “We have no sugar yet.” As he said it, the figure of Swami Sacchidananda emerged from the upper storey, a faint smile playing on his lips, a long yellow robe flowing partly in the wind; and the man was still saying: “There is no sugar today.” In the meantime, a man appeared with a paper box containing figures made of sugar. Cows, horses, ascetics, Brahmacharis, monks, kings, all made of sugar. Somebody said: “Sugar has come.”

And the man who was in charge that day for the preparation of the drink for the Sat-Sangees was addressed by others. A man said: “We shall not dissolve the cow; take it out of the box!” Another said: “Take out the pig!” Another said: “Do not dissolve the ascetic!” Pundit Baijnath heard it and saw all the figures were of sugar. He took handfuls of them and dissolved them in the big jar. What was the monk? Sugar. The policeman, the teacher, the cow, were all sugar. Names and forms are illusory; it was all sugar and nothing but sugar. So the teacher, the Jew, the German, the proletarian, the capitalist, the learned, the unlearnes, are all one Brahman, one consciousness. Let all names and forms be dissolved and let our right sight be: “All is Brahman, nothing but Brahman.” This state is called jnana; this is the true sight and this is what has to be matured in the Sangha life. OM

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